ANTI-NOSTALGIA

A group show of manipulated found photographs

Curated by Olivia Huntley and elin o’Hara slavick

The Carrack / 947 E Main Street / Durham, NC / 27701

October 4-21, 2018

Opening Reception Friday, October 5, 7-9:30pm

Gallery Hours: Thursdays-Sundays 11am - 5pm and Wednesdays by appointment

With works by: Ben Alper, Andy Berner, Michael Barefield, Becky Brown, Allison Coleman, Diego Camposeco, Martha Carter, Joy Drury Cox, Meredith Emery, Jon Feinstein, Ashley Florence, Victor Foster, Adrian Garcia, Raymond Goodman, Beth Grabowski, Rachel Greene, Sharon Lee Hart, Brenda Miller Holmes, Peter Hoffman, Olivia Huntley, Michael Itkoff, Ellie Ivanova, Andrew Ellis Johnson, Ann Pegalow Kaplan, Siri Kaur, Michael Keaveney, Angela Kelly, Jasper Lee, Susan Alta Martin, Cathy McLaurin, Lindsay Metivier, Joy Meyer, Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay, Susan Mullally, Annika Nordenskiold, Ashely Oates, Lesley Patterson-Marx, Kelly Popoff, Samprati Prasad, Bill Santen, Leslie Sheryll, Annie Simpson, elin o’Hara slavick, Susanne Slavick, Leah Sobsey, Cindy Steiler, Liz Steketee, Bill Thelen, Hong-An Truong, Amy White, Laura Sharp Wilson

Workshop / Panel

October 7, Sunday, 2-4pm with Michael Keaveney – Transforming the Photographic

October 21, Sunday, 2-4pm

Panel discussion / gallery talk with curators Olivia Huntley and elin o’Hara slavick and local artists in the exhibition, including Ben Alper, Deepan Mukhopadhyay and Ann Pegalow Kaplan 

Desire has no history. – Susan Sontag

 Anti-Nostalgia is a group exhibition of artists invited to create works utilizing found photographs. Artists explore: our relationship to the photograph as an object; memories and sentimentality; history and the familial; the vernacular and the archive; and alternative and interventionist narratives. A photograph provides both a historical and unattainable reality. Anti-Nostalgia investigates how our attraction to and/or repulsion by found photographs does not come from nostalgia, but comes from a desire to confirm, deny and transform a reality. Theorists argue that nostalgia can be a form of fascism - a longing for a glorified past that leads us down an authoritarian path. Anti-Nostalgia is a topical and critical approach to our current global situation, an attempt to draw attention to the way we read, feel, understand and use imagery in the name of ideology and personal whim.

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DISPLAY OF ARMS

Shared my curatorial experience with UNLOADED in "DISPLAY OF ARMS: A Roundtable Discussion about the Public Exhibition of Firearms and Their History" in Technology and Culture, published by Johns Hopkins University Press and edited by Jennifer Tucker.  In conversation with Glenn Adamson, Jonathan S. Ferguson, Josh Garrett-Davis, Erik Goldstein, Ashley Hlebinsky, and David D. Miller.

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RESORT : ANDREW ELLIS JOHNSON AND SUSANNE SLAVICK

The McDonough Museum of Art at Youngstown State University

September 7 – October 26, 2018

Public Reception, Friday, September 7, 5-7pm

Gallery Talk, Friday, September 7, 5 pm

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions screening, 6-7pm

The John J. McDonough Museum of Art, on the campus of Youngstown State University opens the fall season with RESORT, a traveling exhibition of works by Andrew Ellis Johnson and Susanne Slavick. It accompanies Sanctuary, an exhibition of paintings by John Guy Petruzzi. Both shows will be on view in the galleries September 7 – October 26 with an opening reception on Friday, September 7 from 5-7pm. Susanne Slavick and Andrew Ellis Johnson will give a gallery talk on the evening of the reception beginning at 5pm.

In addressing RESORT Slavick and Johnson comment: “Driven or displaced, cut loose or set adrift, or simply seeking safety—all are precarious states of passage. The decision to leave home may be voluntary or involuntary, arising from desperation or anticipation. RESORT, as a title, reflects that duality. To flee is a last resort. The destination is often another shore, literally or figuratively. The shore can also be a place for a benign kind of escape—an actual vacation resort. Some European vacationers have actually watched refugees wash ashore, from vessels both intact and capsized. We have similar scenarios on land at our own borders, worsened by recent separations of children from their families. RESORT explores the intersection of these two worlds—of security and insecurity— and our responses to those caught between them.”

 

In conjunction with RESORT, there will be several screenings from New Immigrant and Refugee Visions, produced by Community Supported Film. A preview screening will take place on Friday, September 7, 6-7pm. Additional screenings will take place from 12:30 to 1:30pm on September 11,14, 25, 28 and October 9, 12, 23 and 26. New Immigrant and Refugee Visions is a collection of documentary films made by new immigrants that provide unique insider perspectives on both the challenges of integration and the contributions immigrants make to our culture, economy and social fabric.

http://csfilm.org

McDonough galleries are open Tuesday through Saturday from 11am until 4pm.

Office hours are Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm.

The Museum is open to the public and admission is free.

ARTISTS WHO TEACH

Westmoreland Museum of Art, Greensburg PA

August 25 - November 25, 2018

Susanne Slavick will join other artists for gallery talks on Wednesday, September 12 > 5:30-7pm | RSVP

The Cantilever Gallery at The Westmoreland is brimming with contemporary artworks created in a broad range of mediums—painting, sculpture, photography, video, stained glass, installation and mixed media.

While the works themselves explore diverse themes using various techniques and materials, each of the artists in this exhibition share one thing in common—they all teach at one of the numerous colleges and universities in our region.

Artists Who Teach celebrates the incredible talent and broad range of art making in this region today. The 58 artists in this exhibition are all inspiring the next generation of artists by teaching at Carlow University, Carnegie Mellon University, Chatham University, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Robert Morris University, Seton Hill University, Saint Vincent College, University of Pittsburgh/University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg and Westmoreland County Community College.

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 Recuperation:Diurnal, 2007, oil and acrylic on three panels, 80 x 109 inches  The convalescing Cedar of Lebanon in  Recuperation  simultaneously embodies bleak realism and hopeful romanticism.  It is a metaphor for the damage we do to ourselves and how we try to recover. In the daytime version of the painting, pale atmosphere alternates with raw flesh color, suggesting both cruelty and compassion. In the nighttime version, the tree’s amputated limbs are silhouetted against a deep blue vapor.  In 2006, I visited Isola Bella on Lago Maggiore in Italy. That summer, the gardens were in disarray. A freak tornado had torn it apart and uprooted an ancient Cedar of Lebanon. Maintenance workers and gardeners had propped up this huge specimen with pulleys, slings, and guy ropes. Bandages wrapped fractured and stumpy limbs and sprinkler systems were suspended high amongst its branches in hopes for resuscitation. At the time these paintings were made, it was not known if the cedar would survive.  I photographed this poignant spectacle partly because it coincided with my prior research into landscapes of ruin, especially those devastated by war. That summer, the world watched as the 2006 Lebanon War decimated the country, all while the larger war in Iraq raged. The Lebanese town of Qana was attacked for the second time in a decade and suffered extraordinary numbers of civilian deaths, lives that could never be resuscitated.

Recuperation:Diurnal, 2007, oil and acrylic on three panels, 80 x 109 inches

The convalescing Cedar of Lebanon in Recuperation simultaneously embodies bleak realism and hopeful romanticism.  It is a metaphor for the damage we do to ourselves and how we try to recover. In the daytime version of the painting, pale atmosphere alternates with raw flesh color, suggesting both cruelty and compassion. In the nighttime version, the tree’s amputated limbs are silhouetted against a deep blue vapor.

In 2006, I visited Isola Bella on Lago Maggiore in Italy. That summer, the gardens were in disarray. A freak tornado had torn it apart and uprooted an ancient Cedar of Lebanon. Maintenance workers and gardeners had propped up this huge specimen with pulleys, slings, and guy ropes. Bandages wrapped fractured and stumpy limbs and sprinkler systems were suspended high amongst its branches in hopes for resuscitation. At the time these paintings were made, it was not known if the cedar would survive.

I photographed this poignant spectacle partly because it coincided with my prior research into landscapes of ruin, especially those devastated by war. That summer, the world watched as the 2006 Lebanon War decimated the country, all while the larger war in Iraq raged. The Lebanese town of Qana was attacked for the second time in a decade and suffered extraordinary numbers of civilian deaths, lives that could never be resuscitated.

Marx@200 in The Brooklyn Rail

A review by Matthew Friday of Marx@200 in The Brooklyn Rail, June 5, 2018.

Curated y Kathy M. Newman and Susanne Slavick

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WAGING PEACE

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts, Tallahassee FL

May 14- July 7, 2018

Reconstruction (Magenta Beirut), 2007, gouache on archival digital print/Hahnemühle paper, 16 x 20 inches.

Construction scene from Building the Great Mosque of Samarkand by Bihzâd or his workshop for the Zafar-Nâmeh by Sharrafuddîn Yadzî.  Illuminated late 1480’s. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

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MARX@200

Curated by Kathy M. Newman and Susanne Slavick

April 6 - June 10. 2018

SPACE, 812 Liberty Ave, Pittsburgh PA 15222

Artists: Lauren Frances Adams, Maja Bajevic, Nina Beier, Joshua Bienko, Matt Bollinger, Mel Chin, Kathryn Clark, Condé + Beveridge, Jeannette Ehlers, Rayna Fahey, Blake Fall-Conroy, Cao Fei, Claire Fontaine, Coco Fusco, Lungiswa Gqunta, Kilouanji Kia Henda, Ottmar Horl, Alfredo Jaar, Andrew Ellis Johnson, Tavia LaFollette, Christin Lahr, Steve Lambert, Liane Lang, Michael Mallis, Paolo Pedercini, William Powhida, Raqs Media Collective, Erik Ruin, Alex Schaefer, Dread Scott, Elin Slavick, Slinko, Shinique Smith, Jina Valentine, Kirsty Whitlock, and Imin Yeh.

Poster image: Lázaro Saavedra González, Karl Marx, from the Cuban Icon Series, Serigraph, Edition of 50,  24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm.)

Carnegie Mellon press release

Pittsburgh Cultural Trust press release

Reviews:

Artists of the World Unite, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, May 4, 2018

SPACE'S MARX@200 explores the German philosopher and what we can learn from his theoriesPittsburgh City Paper, April 25, 2018

Marx@200 Explores the Socialist Thinker's Legacy, WESA, April 5, 2018

 

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FEMINIST BORDER ARTS FILM FESTIVAL

RESORT, a video co-created with Andrew Ellis Johnson, is included in:

BORDER ZONES LIMINAL BODIES

New Mexico State University  Art Gallery

March 12, 2018 from 10am-6pm

A second screening event occurs on April 16, 2018 from 6pm-8:30pm at the CMI Theater Milton Hall 171 on the campus of NMSU. Sponsored by the Gender & Sexuality Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies Department, and the Creative Media Institute. 

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THE OTHER BORDER WALL

Flatland Gallery, Houston TX

February 12 - March 30, 2018

Organized by JM Design Studio

https://www.otherborderwallproject.com/

Image: Susanne Slavick, Asclepius Viridis Wall shows a "wall" of milkweed plants native to the south central and south eastern United States. 

These plants attract monarch butterflies, a migratory species that travels over 2500 miles each year. These species allude to freedom of movement-- a more welcoming reception to those seeking refuge, safety, reunification with families, a living wage and a better life.

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No Vacation: 'Resort' is a voyage of ‘empathic unsettlement’

RESORT, a two person show by Andrew Ellis Johnson and Susanne Slavick at The Fed Galleries at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Michigan, previewed in this REVUE article by Marla Miller.

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UNLOADED at MCAD, June 9 - July 16, 2017

http://mcad.edu/event/unloaded

Unloaded is a nationally traveling multimedia group exhibition that explores the historic and social issues surrounding the divisive nature of gun ownership in the United States.

Curated by Susanne Slavick, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Art at Carnegie Mellon University, the exhibition presents a number of perspectives on the image and impact of guns in contemporary culture, though none endorse them as a means to an end. Works by twenty-two artists and collaboratives touch upon a host of issues surrounding access to and use of firearms across a range of demographic categories.

The artists in Unloaded visualize the power of the gun as icon and instrument. They explore the role that firearms continue to play in our national mythologies, influencing suicide rates, individual and mass murder statistics, incidents of domestic violence, and the militarization of civilian life. Some show the power that guns wield in our daily realities and personal fantasies. Others mourn and resist that power, doing everything they can to take it away, believing there are better ways to resolve conflicts, ensure safety, and keep the peace.